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The FCC’s net neutrality hole

Posted January 4th, 2016 in net neutrality and tagged , by Alton Drew

As a regulatory agency it’s impossible for the Federal Communications Commission to avoid political discourse. When the likes of John Oliver goes about explaining net neutrality to the public (and getting it wrong in the process), the result is four million American consumers applying political pressure on the Commission to ensure that the agency preserve the democratic spirit of the internet; that each piece of content stand equally shoulder to shoulder no matter who produces the content or whether the content reaches one million people or one hundred. When it comes to the economics of the internet then network management be damned.

But for all its rhetoric on equality of access, the Commission appears to have dug a hole into which to throw economically disadvantaged consumers. As Mark Jamison argues in this piece for TechPolicyDaily.com, net neutrality has a negative impact on low income consumers who may not be accessing online content because of the cost of purchasing broadband. Net neutrality hurts the poor by:

1. Prohibiting pricing plans that help the poor pay for what they can afford;

2. Imposing injunctions on the free delivery of some content or zero-pricing; and

3. Prohibiting access to net work features such as fast lanes by fledgling firms.

If the Commission is serious about furthering the closure of the digital divide then it should not allow a delusional argument that all traffic should be treated equally to stop access by the poor to some online content for free. Supporting an erroneous political position as advocated by net neutrality proponents forces the Commission to take a public policy position that is adverse not only to its stated goals but to the poor.

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