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Do the markets see an entry problem for new content providers?

On 18 February 2016, the Federal Communications Commission issued a notice of inquiry asking for comments on how regulation can best address reducing barriers to entry to the video content provider market. The Commission believes that cable companies and other multi-channel video programming distributors are in a position to impede the entry of smaller video content providers into the video market. But do video content providers really need the Commission’s help to enter the content provider market? I don’t think so. Rather than going through the twists and turns of a legal argument on whether the Commission has the authority to address the question, why not let the markets determine what content gets offered and accepted by its participants?

Take for example Netflix. Netflix started out as a supplier of rented DVDs distributed via the U.S. mail. While the company still rents out movies in DVD format, it’s its online format that Netflix is best known for today. Consumers now download video content that Netflix has a license to present or can download content produced originally by the online content provider. While its stock has taken a beating over the last twelve months, traders still look at the online video provider as competing ably with the likes of a Comcast or Time Warner’s video product.

From the programming perspective, Netflix produces original content i.e. “House of Cards”, “Orange is the New Black”, and “Marco Polo”, as a hedge, according to Morningstar analyst Neil Macker, against other content programmers that may be holding back their own content from distribution. Netflix, as a result of data captured from its user base, is able to develop or purchase content that suits its viewers’ needs. In other words, Netflix has properly reinvested its capital and other resources to provide a superior content experience as well as built rapidly on an older business model after recognizing and taking advantage of new technology.

Other content providers are going down Netflix’s path. Amazon not only distributes content via the internet but also produces its own content. Hulu is reportedly purchasing original content for distribution as well.

The Commission is running the risk of promising a more open environment for all content imaginable; sending a message that all content is created equally. The Commission is ignoring the fact that there are limited number of distribution channels, whether via cable or over-the-top, and that this natural limit in distributors will create a bottleneck through which only the content deemed attracting the greatest demand will be able to wiggle through. Content that attracts the greatest demand will draw the most see capital investment creating the vicious cycle that smaller entrants will face and the Commission naively assumes it will regulate away.

 

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