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Using broadband to create? Then you need to live in an urban or suburban area

The U.S. Department of Commerce yesterday put out a report documenting gaps in access to broadband between rural and urban communities as well as the variation in access to broadband within these two communities. The major conclusions of the report was that urban areas had greater access to both wireline and wireless broadband versus their neighbors in rural areas. Also, while population density played a role in which areas have higher access to broadband, locating closer to central cities may be of more significance in broadband adoption.

For example, according to the report, residents living in the exurbs, where population density is around 37 residents per square mile, have greater access to higher-speed wireline services than their counterparts in small towns, where population density is approximately 1,447 residents per square mile. Keep in mind that exurbs are considered as part of the rural community while small towns are urban areas. Exurbs, however, are part of metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) where central cities are the core of their populations. The study concludes that this proximity of exurbs to central cities may play a role in why a smaller density jurisdictions like an exurb may have greater access to higher speed services versus a small town which is not located in an MSA.

As I do here as well as on my other blog at Alton Drew, I place a lot of emphasis on accumulating and using capital, whether financial, or natural as in spectrum. Broadband is capital in the hands of creatives. Whether writers, designers, or app developers, access to broadband is key and if location to central cities increases the chances of quality broadband availability, people like me will be staying in Atlanta and other MSAs.

But what should this say about public policy? Should the Federal Communications Commission create more interventionist policies in order to bring some balance to the variations between and within the urban and rural communities? You can’t order carriers to provide the same speeds to rural and urban areas and universal service funding is far from guaranteeing a provider will enter rural markets to provide higher speed services. Evidence shows, especially where municipals provide broadband services, that new entrants are entering markets where incumbent services already exist.

The best policy would be to allow consumers to signal to market players that they are willing to pay the premium for services that are more costly to provide because of the low population densities. This is the best incentive for attracting broadband providers.

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U.S.V.I. keeps moving along on broadband deployment

Posted September 1st, 2011 in Broadband, insular and tagged , , , , by Alton Drew

An article posted recently in the St.Thomas Source.com about the continued efforts to deploy broadband in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The territory has contracted with Alcatel-Lucent to construct and deploy cable between St. Thomas and Water Island. The bill is estimated at $5.6 million.

This week’s hurricane activity is evidence that deploying these facilities is necessary to keep insular areas like the U.S. Virgin Islands connected to the mainland.