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By pursuing STEM education and digital media opportunities, minorities can add value to broadband

Posted August 30th, 2015 in Broadband, edge providers, Internet, media and tagged , by Alton Drew

A recent article in the Times-Pucayune has me thinking (again) about the approach inner city communities take to developing their economies.  It has me questioning the entire “community activist” approach to bringing jobs and businesses to an area.  In the article the heads of a number of non-profits and a small business participated in a panel discussion on economic development post Hurricane Katrina.

The panelists raised concerns about billions of public and private sector  coming into the New Orleans area while black businesses were relegated to the sidelines with hardly any of this new capital flowing to them.  If the article caught the sentiments of the panelists correctly, the emphasis of the panel appeared to be on creating more public policy that would ensure more public and private funds go to black-owned businesses.

What I didn’t pick up from the article was any discussion on what value black-owned businesses in New Orleans would bring to an investor; whether these businesses could generate sizable returns on and growth of capital to satisfy an investors.

One area of growth is digital media.  According to an article in The South China Morning Post, an unprecedented amount of capital is flowing to online media outlets like, Vice Media, and Vox Media.

One thing for sure is that it won’t be barbershops, beauty salons, convenience stores, package stores, or fast food restaurants.  These types of businesses make up what you see in black communities.  They have low barriers to entry and are very competitive industries.  They are also what I call “echo effect” industries which most people also call service industries.  These industries pop up to serve people who people who work in what I call the “impact” industries.  In San Francisco, an echo effect industry is a dry cleaners.  The impact industry is Google or a data analytics firm where its workers are creating intellectual property and earning the higher incomes that come with it.

In black communities it’s tough for these impact industries to get started because the first investment in intellectual capital hasn’t been made.  For example, in Delaware only 19% of African American students are enrolled in STEM-related courses. Getting students into these courses is necessary if entrepreneurship in the tech area is ever to grow in the African American community itself.

STEM-related employment is expected to grow 16% between 2014 and 2024, according to the website,  Non-STEM jobs are expected to grow 11% over the same period.  And right now students of color are not getting the inspiration they need to pursue the education that leads them into the more lucrative STEM careers.  Again, according to, African-Americans and Hispanics comprise just over 20% of those who earn computing degrees.

If black communities are to generate business ideas that capture capital and generate higher incomes in the 21st century, its leaders have to recognize the clog in the labor supply line.  That clog is caused by a labor pool that is growing to slow to meet STEM-related demand.  The community approach to generating wealth sets itself up for failure if its leadership does not take a more proactive and innovative approach to managing the community’s political economy. Falling back on arguments for revamping affirmative action alone wont lead to a revitalized economy.

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The pursuit of greater returns on capital resulted in the blurring of telecom, media, and entertainment

Part of the naivete of the net neutrality argument was how it ignored the realities of the broadband industry and the role of capital.  Broadband access to the internet has never been about the democratization of self-expression but about the commercialization of the exchange of information.  Information comes in various forms whether it is scholarly work, news, or entertainment.  As Ivan Seidenberg notes in this piece, the lines between media, telecommunications, and entertainment have been blurring for decades where the silos that once represented media, telecom, and entertainment have finally been broken down.

If investors who put their capital into these industries want to see higher returns, then acknowledging that these walls have broken down is the first step they should take.  Pushing back against government actions that fail to recognize that breaking down these walls is necessary for capital to continue flowing to and growing in these industries should be the second thing to acknowledge.

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How can the FCC help expand the broadband economy

Yesterday Michael O’Rielly provided a definition of the internet economy during remarks made before the Internet Innovation Alliance.

“Here is a simple truth.  The Internet thrives today on aggregating information for the purposes of increasing advertising revenues and the use of data analysis for multiple purposes.  Data and advertising are why Internet-related companies are valued so highly by investors and Wall Street, and why those companies that cannot monetize such activities face harsh realities and uncertain futures.”

In other words, regulators need to understand that the commercial internet is an infrastructure that facilitates data trade and that the regulations they implement can limit the type of data collected over the internet by internet-related companies.  Broadband operators are involved in this data trade.  For example, Comcast collects non-personally identifiable data that they may share with third-parties for the purpose of targeting advertisement.  This non-personally identifiable data may include IP and HTTP header information; a consumer’s device address; a consumer’s web browser; or a consumer’s operating system when using Comcast’s web services.  Where a Comcast subscriber is trying to personalize the use of Comcast’s web services, the consumer may provide to the broadband provider for storage the consumer’s zip code, age, or gender information.

The competition that gets ignored by regulators is the competition broadband providers face in the capture and sale of consumer data.  This competition includes cloud storage companies, content creators, and app developers.  It also includes companies in the internet, publishing, and broadcasting industry with familiar names like Facebook, Google, and Yahoo. According to Hoover’s, these companies publish content online or operate websites that guide information consumers to the content they are seeking.

Demand for this industry’s services is driven by consumer or business needs for information and other forms of content. Profit is created when these companies deliver relevant information to consumers while offering advertisers a targeted audience.  According to Hoover’s, sales of online advertisements account for just over half of U.S. industry revenue with 75% of advertising revenue coming from search and display advertising formats.

Comcast was hoping to make major inroads into advertising with its proposed acquisition of Time Warner.  Writing for in February 2014, Jeanine Poggi wrote:

“Assuming the deal is approved, however, it will make Comcast become a more important partner for advertisers, said Ken Doctor, affiliate analyst, Outsell. Its expanded role as both a content producer and content distributor will make it all the more competitive for ad dollars with companies like Yahoo, AOLGoogle, and Facebook. “It will become more of an ad competitor as selling of TV [and] digital inventory blurs,” he said.”

Writing further, Ms. Poggi points out that:

“A merged Comcast reaching 30 million U.S. households, along with the national reach of DirecTV and Dish Network, creates an alternative to buying national advertising from the TV networks, said Jason Kanefsky, exec VP-strategic investments, Havas Media.”

Unfortunately for Comcast investors, the Federal Communications Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice bought into the pseudo net neutrality argument pushed by grassroots groups and Netflix that mergers such as Comcast and Time Warner would somehow thwart the average man’s ability to express themselves online and that a larger Comcast would be a detriment to competition in broadband access.  Allowing the merger it appears would have given advertisers, from large corporations to small entrepreneurs, alternatives for online advertising.  The economies of scale that a Comcast-Time Warner marriage would have produced may have lead to lower advertising rates especially for smaller companies.  The FCC’s new Title II rules for broadband companies may only serve to further foreclose such scale.

The issue is, under the current rules and statutes, should broadband providers be prohibited for sharing data with advertisers or other third-parties seeking to target ads at a broadband provider’s subscribers?  I believe the answer is no and investors should lobby the FCC to ensure that no such rules are drafted.

47 CFR 8 of the FCC’s rules for protecting the open internet provides no explicit prohibition on a broadband operator providing third-parties with subscriber data that could be used to deliver advertisement.  Section 8.11 of the rules, in my opinion, gives broadband operators an argument for providing customer data to third-parties, particularly edge providers.  Specifically, the rule says:

“Any person engaged in the provision of broadband Internet access service, insofar as such person is so engaged, shall not unreasonably interfere with or unreasonably disadvantage end users’ ability to select, access, and use broadband Internet access service or the lawful Internet content, applications, services, or devices of their choice, or edge providers’ ability to make lawful content, applications, services, or devices available to end users. Reasonable network management shall not be considered a violation of this rule.”

Section 222 of the Communications Act does not expressly prohibit use of consumer information for advertising purposes, but given that the statute is written for telecommunications companies, Congressional action would be needed to amend the section with language that reflects how broadband and other internet companies use consumer information.

If the FCC wants to help expand the broadband economy, it will have to persuade Congress to make these language changes lest leave investors in a state of uncertainty.







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Lifeline is about promoting a good society

Today the Federal Communications Commission voted on a notice of proposed rule-making to extend Lifeline services to include access to broadband.  The internet provides modern society an enhanced conduit for sending and receiving messages and data.  This capability allows businesses to provide innovative services on a cost-effective basis and allows consumers an efficient mode for accessing services.

For example, yesterday I met with my new primary care physician.  Not only was I impressed with her personality and knowledge but I was also impressed with how her office uses the internet to manage patient health.  Her patients can get online and register with her information portal in order to review their prescriptions, other medical information, and contact the doctor or her staff with questions.  I can do all this with a laptop and a high-speed internet access connection.

The internet and the high-speed broadband access services that allow us to connect to it provide mechanisms for society to carry out its purpose: to help spread the risks that threaten the abundance of life.  We join societies in order to share resources, maximize our wealth, and increase our security.  Broadband access does that by giving society’s members access to multiple sources of information and data.

Today’s discussion at the FCC unfortunately got hung up on issues such as fraud and waste.  FCC member Mike O’Rielly was correct when he said that today’s vote should have been a five to zero slam dunk but as Chairman Tom Wheeler also noted, it was unfortunate that the issue had become politicized.

If waste and fraud are an issue then the FCC should take consider a couple approaches shared by AT&T’s vice president for external affairs, Jim Cicconi.  In a blog post posted 1 June 2015, Mr. Cicconi  offered the following:

“First, AT&T believes that the government, not carriers, should be responsible for determining Lifeline eligibility and enrollment.  This is the way most federal benefit programs work, and there’s no good reason for handling Lifeline in a radically different way.  Many of the problems associated with Lifeline are rooted in this flawed approach.  Administrative burdens on carriers today are huge, and innocent mistakes can lead to disproportionate punishment—which in turn discourages carrier participation.  And the potential for fraud by less reputable players is very real.  Moreover, consumers are saddled with difficult burdens if they simply want to change carriers.  Government itself should determine eligibility, and can provide the benefit through a debit card approach much like food stamps.  Consumers could then use the benefit for the service of their choice.”

The FCC should keep its eyes on the prize.  It can play an important role in keeping society’s members connected to today’s most important piece of capital, knowledge.  Waste and fraud, albeit important considerations from an operational standpoint should not be a barrier to implementing equitable social policy.

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Verizon to FCC: We are a media company. Leave us alone

Verizon sent another clear signal this morning to regulators and the financial markets.  We are transitioning from a broadband company to a media company.  Suppose Verizon takes it another step and also declares that they, say five years from now, will get out of the broadband access to the internet business and settle for being a channel solely for their own branded content or content that they get a license to retransmit solely on their servers?  Such a move would get them from under the Federal Communications Commission’s Title II/net neutrality rules while opening the door to smaller internet service providers to fill the broadband access to the internet market vacuum.

First, the news.  Today, The Wall Street Journal reported that Verizon Communications Inc., agreed to buy AOL, Inc., for $4.4 billion.  The purchase will be made with cash on hand and the issuance of commercial paper and make Verizon a player in the digital media content market.  According to The Journal:

“The acquisition would give Verizon, which has set its sights on entering the crowded online video marketplace, access to advanced technology AOL has developed for selling ads and delivering high-quality Web video.”

Verizon goes on to say that its principal interest in the purchase is access to AOL’s ad tech platform probably for use with Verizon’s mobile video service scheduled to launch this summer.  The service will offer snippets of video content, live sports, concerts, and on-demand programming.

Verizon and AT&T believe video content will drive demand for their wireless services as consumers, particularly millenials, (who have passed Generation X-ers as America’s largest consumer group), prefer get their content anywhere on the go, unlike their more sendentary Baby Boomer elders.

Verizon can also leverage its relationships with content providers.  For example, according to the article:

“Verizon already has relationships with many media providers because of its FiOS TV service, which is available in 5.6 million U.S. households. And it has shown prowess in mobile video already, including through a partnership with the NFL that allows it to stream some games over phones.”

It sounds like Verizon is ready to step up to being what I consider all broadband providers to be: media companies.  Regulatory wise, I think Verizon and AT&T could circumvent the FCC’s net neutrality rules by making the declaration that not only are they media companies, but they are no longer in the business of providing access to the 67,000 interconnected networks known as the internet.  Verizon instead should declare that it provides IP-access solely to its website of original and licensed content.  If you want to see “Game of Thrones”, you’ll use a broadband access provider that connects you with HBO’s website.

A broadband internet access service, according to Section 8.2(A) of the FCC’s net neutrality rules is “a mass retail service by wire or radio that provides capability to transmit data to and receive data from all or substantially all Internet endpoints, including any capabilities that are incidental to and enable the operation of the communication service, but excluding dial-up Internet access service.  This term also encompasses any service that the Commission finds to be providing a functional equivalent of the service described in the previous sentence, or that is used to evade the protections set forth in this Part.”

If Verizon describes in its service agreement that access to its particular content found on its website does not include access to the other endpoints found on the remaining 67,000 networks, should that take them out of the FCC’s net neutrality stranglehold?  I would hope so.  Yes, the FCC and the grassroots groups will still utter in their last gasps that even if this new media model held that Verizon’s subscribers would still need consumer protections, but in my opinion those protections would come under contract law and a better equipped Federal Trade Commission since Verizon and any other broadband provider opting for a new media model would fall in the category of edge provider.

Let’s shake it up a little, Verizon.  This is the right step toward bringing well needed disruption into the media market.