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Paid prioritization would get the GOP bill closer to ideal

Today the hashtags, #openinternet and #netneutrality were used extensively as the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation and the House Sub-committee on Communications and Technology listened to testimony that they hope will help refine draft legislation designed to rein in the Federal Communications Commission while bringing clarity on paid prioritization, unreasonable network management, discrimination against network traffic, and access to legal websites.

The bill expressly prohibits paid prioritization, which allows content providers to enter agreements with broadband providers that allow traffic higher priority for certain traffic to end-users.  The argument against paid prioritization has been that smaller content providers would not be able to compete with the big dogs who have deeper pockets and can afford to pay to get their traffic placed before the rest of the dog pile.  But what this view fails to consider is that firms willing to pay for priority treatment of their traffic recognize the value to their subscribers that their traffic has and paying to get that traffic to content subscribers is a cost that will generate benefits.

Content providers are not shy about the how failure to get traffic to subscribers in a timely fashion might impact their business models.  Take for eample the investment information firm, Morningstar.

Morningstar is in the information and services delivery industry.  The Chicago-based firm provides independent investment research to subscribers around the globe.  It relies on internet technology to deliver its services, thus an ability to upgrade to the newest technology is necessary if content providers like Morningstar are to remain competitive.  Outages of their network data centers can result in lost customers and lost revenues.  According to Morningstar:

“Many of our client contracts contain service-level agreements that require us to meet certain obligations for delivering time-sensitive, up-to-date data and information. We may not be able to meet these obligations in the event of failure or downtime in our information systems. Our operations and those of our suppliers and customers are vulnerable to interruption by fire, earthquake, power loss, telecommunications failure, terrorist attacks, wars, Internet failures or disruptions, computer viruses, and other events beyond our control. Our database and network facilities may also be vulnerable to external attacks that misappropriate our data, corrupt our databases, or limit access to our information systems.

Most of our products and services depend heavily on our electronic delivery systems and the Internet. Our ability to deliver information using the Internet may be impaired because of infrastructure failures, service outages at third-party Internet providers, malicious attacks, or other factors. If disruptions, failures, or slowdowns of our electronic delivery systems or the Internet occur, our ability to distribute our products and services effectively and to serve our customers may be impaired.”

Question is, would a statutory ban on paid prioritization benefit Morningstar or other firms in the information delivery services industry where, again, timeliness ois of the essence?  If contracts with their clients call for liabilities where data is not delivered in a timely manner or where quality is eroded, can Morningstar afford prohibition from entering priority contracts?

While the bill is a good start toward bringing clarity and closure to the net neutrality debate, Congress needs to focus on the commercial aspects of the internet and keep in mind that speed and capacity are the characteristics that make the exchange of information over the internet far more superior, productive, and profitable than any other medium.  Paid prioritization is about meeting customer needs and recognizing the value certain content brings not only to the subscribing end users but to the economy as a whole.

 

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Objectivity a means to advocacy

Posted December 22nd, 2011 in Broadband, Internet, journalism and tagged , , by Alton Drew

Thanks to my good friend Joe Miller for sharing this article via a Tweet. The article discusses objectivity and advocacy in journalism. The Internet provides a lot of online content on various topics and this content is driven by positions or views on how the world should be.

There is nothing wrong with that as long as the position starts out with the writer being honest about what they are observing in the environment they are writing about.

Consumers of online content should be aware of this filtering system as well. It will help them decipher nonsense from quality.