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Lifeline is about promoting a good society

Today the Federal Communications Commission voted on a notice of proposed rule-making to extend Lifeline services to include access to broadband.  The internet provides modern society an enhanced conduit for sending and receiving messages and data.  This capability allows businesses to provide innovative services on a cost-effective basis and allows consumers an efficient mode for accessing services.

For example, yesterday I met with my new primary care physician.  Not only was I impressed with her personality and knowledge but I was also impressed with how her office uses the internet to manage patient health.  Her patients can get online and register with her information portal in order to review their prescriptions, other medical information, and contact the doctor or her staff with questions.  I can do all this with a laptop and a high-speed internet access connection.

The internet and the high-speed broadband access services that allow us to connect to it provide mechanisms for society to carry out its purpose: to help spread the risks that threaten the abundance of life.  We join societies in order to share resources, maximize our wealth, and increase our security.  Broadband access does that by giving society’s members access to multiple sources of information and data.

Today’s discussion at the FCC unfortunately got hung up on issues such as fraud and waste.  FCC member Mike O’Rielly was correct when he said that today’s vote should have been a five to zero slam dunk but as Chairman Tom Wheeler also noted, it was unfortunate that the issue had become politicized.

If waste and fraud are an issue then the FCC should take consider a couple approaches shared by AT&T’s vice president for external affairs, Jim Cicconi.  In a blog post posted 1 June 2015, Mr. Cicconi  offered the following:

“First, AT&T believes that the government, not carriers, should be responsible for determining Lifeline eligibility and enrollment.  This is the way most federal benefit programs work, and there’s no good reason for handling Lifeline in a radically different way.  Many of the problems associated with Lifeline are rooted in this flawed approach.  Administrative burdens on carriers today are huge, and innocent mistakes can lead to disproportionate punishment—which in turn discourages carrier participation.  And the potential for fraud by less reputable players is very real.  Moreover, consumers are saddled with difficult burdens if they simply want to change carriers.  Government itself should determine eligibility, and can provide the benefit through a debit card approach much like food stamps.  Consumers could then use the benefit for the service of their choice.”

The FCC should keep its eyes on the prize.  It can play an important role in keeping society’s members connected to today’s most important piece of capital, knowledge.  Waste and fraud, albeit important considerations from an operational standpoint should not be a barrier to implementing equitable social policy.