Comments Off

The pursuit of greater returns on capital resulted in the blurring of telecom, media, and entertainment

Part of the naivete of the net neutrality argument was how it ignored the realities of the broadband industry and the role of capital.  Broadband access to the internet has never been about the democratization of self-expression but about the commercialization of the exchange of information.  Information comes in various forms whether it is scholarly work, news, or entertainment.  As Ivan Seidenberg notes in this piece, the lines between media, telecommunications, and entertainment have been blurring for decades where the silos that once represented media, telecom, and entertainment have finally been broken down.

If investors who put their capital into these industries want to see higher returns, then acknowledging that these walls have broken down is the first step they should take.  Pushing back against government actions that fail to recognize that breaking down these walls is necessary for capital to continue flowing to and growing in these industries should be the second thing to acknowledge.

Comments Off

Why can’t broadband competition proponents focus on the real picture?

The Center for Public Integrity released a post yesterday that has me questioning their economics integrity.  In the post, the Center describes how broadband providers avoid competition by arguing that the “Internet service grew out of the old telephone and cable TV systems, where only two companies owned direct lines to U.S. households.”  Sorry, but that’s only half the story.  As I shared in my comments on the post:

“Advocates for competition in the broadband access platform market need look no further than the localities that ensure that only the provider with the deepest pockets are able to get entry into a market. Onerous financial, regulatory, and technical barriers keep ouyt smaller players. Richard Bennett makes a powerful point about legacy carriers having no incentives to go beyond service territories they negotiated for or acquired when initiating services.

In addition, there is too much emphasis on the “number of carriers” narrative. This is a capital intensive business and unless new players can muster up the cash, then you won’t see a third wireline carrier entering a market.

Finally, when will “competition proponents” come out and give a definitive number for the amount of carriers in a market necessary for a declaration of competition. Two, three, or four carriers still reflects an imperfect competitive market.”

Not only are Federal Communications Commission rules not promoting broadband deployment, but local government policies are adding to the hindrance.  No one complains about whether Interstate 4 connecting Tampa and Orlando should have a duplicate interstate running along it.  The concern is whether there is enough commerce running over the highway to spur economic growth and justify widening the existing lanes.

For example, according to comScore.com’s report , 2015 U.S. Digital Future in Focus”, in 2014, mobile app usage made up the majority of digital media activity.  Traditional television ratings fell as more Americans obtained content from emerging online platforms.    Seventy-five percent of all digital consumers over the age of 18 use desktop and mobile platforms to access Internet content.

Another sign of mobile’s encroachment on the desktop is growth in smartphone use.  According to comScore, smartphone use increased 16% in 2014.

I just started watching “House of Cards” (Okay, I’m a late bloomer) so now I’m counted as one of 7 of 8 Americans watching video content online, with half of these consumers watching content online on a daily basis.

And about that commerce moving along the roadway?  E-commerce grew 14% in 2014 with businesses raking in $268.5 billion.

All this content and e-commerce activity happening while consumers allegedly are “abused” by a lack of broadband access platform competition.  Policy makers shouldn’t waste their time on making an oligopoly a larger oligopoly.  The focus should be on clearing spectrum for greater use of the internet and ensuring that the provision of data, whether in the form of video or text, is not interfered with.

Comments Off

What I wanted to ask the commissioners ….

It was pretty cool seeing Federal Communications Commission members Mignon Clyburn, Jessica Rosenworcel, Ajit Pai, and Michael O’Rielly at the Minority Media Telecommunications Council Access to Capital breakfast earlier this morning.  For the MMTC it was historic having four commissioners on the same panel.

Chairman Wheeler piped in later in the morning via a video.

The Four Horsemen talked about E-rate, spectrum auction, the spectrum auction participation waiver for Grain Management, and net neutrality as well as on diversity in media overall.  I expected the commissioners to take questions from the audience but time allegedly did not permit.  I was ticked, for I had two-part question that I wanted them each to answer.  Here is the question:

“Capital abhors a vacuum.  It moves to activities that provide the greatest returns and in technology that means activities that disrupt the current business model.  The FCC regulates broadband and media markets.  Do you have any insights on trends and innovation that may attract new capital to the broadband and media markets?  Also, what should be the FCC’s role in market disruption?”

I did have a second question which Commissioner Pai answered when I caught up with him at the elevator as he was heading back to the FCC.  I asked the Commissioner how he thought the Chiefs were going to do this year and with a smile he said we’d have to wait and see.”

Anyway, if the commissioners read this blog hopefully the’ll take a few moments and answer….