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Caribbean creatives can benefit from zero rating services

Posted October 13th, 2016 in Broadband, capital, content providers, data plans and tagged , , , by Alton Drew

As a native of the Caribbean, my attention has been turning toward global trade in telecommunications markets, primarily between the United States and the Caribbean. While I have a bias toward the English-speaking nations in the Eastern Caribbean having family in that sub-region, and I was born and raised in St.Thomas, it doesn’t mean that I don’t have love for the Spanish, French, and Dutch speaking islands. I just haven’t learned the languages yet. So, paciente, por favor.

Caribbean Export recently published an outlook on Caribbean trade in 2016 and 2017. It takes $500,000 to $2,000,000 for an artist to break into mainstream music markets. Population sizes on smaller island nations force Caribbean music artists to attempt expansion into North American, Asian, and European markets. The survey points out that online streaming is one approach used by artists to sell back catalogs and new music, with 25% of revenues accounted for online. According to Caribbean Export:

“The move to online consumption of music has some significant benefits for emerging artistes.  Online streaming and sales allow the artiste to understand what types of music and artistes are popular in which markets.  This can demonstrate which market may be most relevant for them to target with their music … The Information Technology revolution of the 1990s and the advent of social media have presented a wider reach to artistes today than has ever been possible.  In the age of the Internet, success is possible where an artiste with a quality product can inspire people to share their product, thereby creating millions of impressions. In other words, the sheer accessibility provided by the Internet means that an artiste can release content directly to a global audience, but it is important to stand out.”

The global Caribbean Diaspora numbers approximately 10.7 million with four million of those immigrants living in the United States. Mobile broadband, online streaming and social media can get an artist’s content in front of this audience quickly as discussed before. I believe what can also help is a free data approach combined with other strategic partnership initiatives. For example, where a carrier like Verizon can offer free access to a Caribbean artist website without a subscriber incurring a charge against their data cap, the consumer enjoys the benefit of exposure to new music which may lead to additional sales for the artist. The subscriber is also incentivized to explore other offerings via her smartphones, offerings she hopefully will be willing to pay for.

Another benefit from this type of global trade is the creation of demand for more infrastructure deployment. Increased content and new content delivery systems will need additional fixed line and wireless platforms to run on.

The Caribbean Diaspora should look at advocating for and investing in the development of online streaming for Caribbean artists as a type of remittance program. Greater support for these artists results in greater revenues eventually returning to our homelands with the benefits of infrastructure development both in the Caribbean and here in the United States.