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On March 31st, the FCC will immerse itself further into information markets

Posted March 28th, 2016 in Broadband, edge providers, Federal Communications Commission, privacy and tagged , , by Alton Drew

The Federal Communications Commission will issue a notice of proposed rulemaking on 31 March 2016 providing requirements that internet service providers should follow in order to protect personal information of consumers. Commission chairman, Tom Wheeler, describes the proposed rules as an initiative that gives consumers the “tools they need to make informed choices about how and whether their data is used and shared by broadband providers. Mr. Wheeler has constructed his rules within a framework of three principles: 1. Consumer choice, where consumers exercise meaningful choice over what data an ISP can use and how it can be shared; 2. Transparency, where consumers are made aware of what types of information an ISP is collecting and how that information is being used; and 3. Security, where ISPs have an obligation to protect information where ever it is carried over a network and stored. While consumers can “opt-out” from having their personal information used by ISPs in order to market additional services to the consumer, the consumer must opt-in to the use of their information for any other purposes. Anyone following the Commission since Mr. Wheeler’s ascent to the chairmanship acknowledges that this is a partisan commission and leading the opposition on this notice of proposed ruling is Commissioner Mike O’Rielly. Mr. O’Rielly refers to the proposed rules as “troubling and conflicting” given that these rules may not apply to other internet companies like Google and Facebook.  Mr. O’Rielly also takes issue with the Commission flirting with issues such as data security and data breach, issues, he argues, that are not covered by the Communications Act. And Mr. O’Rielly is correct. Data breach and security are not covered by the Communications Act. Nor does the Communications Act describe broadband access providers as telecommunications companies. In addition, ISP access to consumer proprietary information is limited, according to research conducted by Peter Swire, Justin Hemmings, and Alana Kirkland. Also, other companies have access to more information and a wider use of personal information than ISPs. Mr. Wheeler is playing with judicial uncertainty betting that the U.S. Court of Appeals-District of Columbia will uphold the Commission’s reclassification of broadband services as telecommunications services thus extending the 20th century protections of Section 222 of the Act for telephone customer personal information to consumers subscribing to 21st century broadband access services as well. Will Mr. Wheeler’s rules lead to an increase in deployment of broadband facilities? I don’t see it. Ironically, Mr. Wheeler’s rules may cause a conflict between sections 1302 and 222 of the Communications Act.  Why would ISPs, pursuant to the Commission’s directive under section 1302 of the Act, want to increase deployment of broadband access platforms if their ability to gather, package, and sell consumer information is going to be heavily regulated by rules, supported by section 202 of the Act, that don’t apply to social media networks that are increasingly gathering more consumer data than ISPs?